Ram Chandra Series

Retelling of The Ramayana by Amish Tripathi

Amish Tripathi’s ambitious re-telling of Ramayana with a visionary perspective, spans over four books, with one yet to be released.

All the books have so far ended at the same event – though the story is told with clever liberty in point of view of three protagonists. Amish is yet to weave the end of the story in his forthcoming book.

RAM – Scion of Ikshvaku

Purushottam Ram

Bereft of any magical power, Ram Chandra has been portrayed as the promised messiah who traverses down a road full of thorns to the mighty throne of Ayodha. Born on the day Dasarath looses to Raavan in an epic battle, only to be saved by Kaikeyi – Ram is deemed as curse to Ayodhya. Over years with his unwavering devotion to knowledge and righteousness, Ram eventually rises to his name. He embraces his fate of exile to forest with Sita and Lakshman. Notably, Amish has ingeniously mentioned Jaalikaatu in an turn of events involving Sugreev and Bali.

“Truth. Duty. Honour”

Ram, Amish Tripathi

Sita – Warrior of Mithila

Epitome of Piousness and Direction

In Amish Triptahi’s narrative, Sita is deemed as the intelligent and fiercely brilliant adopted daughter of Mithlesh. Mithila was protected with compartment like fence walls. Sita ensured mantainence of law and order in Mithila. The apple of eyes of the whole kingdom is won by Ram’s chivalrous feat in Swayamvar. Sita is depicted as not just a demure lady but rather a fiercely loyal princess ready to do anything for family. She fights off fiercely and is captured by Ravaan only because her best friend betrays her trust.

“Many people are not wise enough to count life’s blessings. They keep focusing instead on what the world has denied them.”

SITA, Amish Tripathi

Raavan – Enemy of Aryavarta

Example of destruction due to Arrogance

Raavan is,in my opinion, one of the most misunderstood characters of Ramayan. He was devoted to Shiva with his heart and soul. The reason for his downfall was his extreme arrogance and vain of his text knowledge. He was the richest traders in the South. To revenge the death of Vedavati, Ravaan indulges a war on Bharat solely fueled by his anger. Though you may start sympathizing with him initially, Amish’s narrative doesn’t allow you to be overcome with the darkness which Ravaan suffered from – rather you are led to the point where he could have turned back and not be a savage king. To be able to choose good over bad is the nexus of the storyline.

“There is a lion and a deer within each of us. Only if we nurture the lion will we make something of ourselves. If we indulge the deer, we’ll be running and hiding all our lives.”

Raavan, amish tripathi

The base of the epic saga has been lain in appropriate narrative. Several twists become hard to take in – like the Swayamvar where Ram strikes the eye of the fish through a revolving wheel. An ingenious pick up from Mahabharata rather. But then again, the story grips you so much that you will forget to question such trivial matters. Amish Tripathi has rightfully clamped on the pulse of new generation of readers who want the Mythology in new cover.

Thus Ram Chandra Series is one of the leading mythological books. Breathlessly waiting for the next book which will be the last installment for the series. Though he has already published the next book – “Suheldev” – apparently a standalone and will be adapted into motion picture.

Buy all the three books here!

Head over to comment section and let us know if you have read the book. You can also reach me on Facebook or Instagram to share your views.

Cheers to Reading!

Published by Ordo Ab Chao

Indian Blogger

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